Credit Crisis in Europe

Credit Crisis in Europe: How the Stability of an Entire Region is Teetering on the Edge of a Major Collapse
 
By EWI's European Financial Forecast editor Brian Whitmer (excerpt)
Panic Now and Avoid the Rush -- July 30, 2010

The market's collective sigh of relief is also reflected in authorities' stress testing of 91 European banks. In case you missed last Friday's results, their message is clear: relax. 

The Committee of European Banking Supervisors (CEBS) gave passing grades to nearly every bank on its list. The group, for example, passed both Irish banks and all four UK banks that it evaluated. The CEBS gave clean bills of health to all four Portuguese banks, all five Italian banks, and five out of six Greek banks that it analyzed. 

Even with share prices that sit 29%-66% beneath their 2009 countertrend highs, the CEBS says that the Bank of Ireland, Piraeus Bank, Banco Popolare, and Banco Santander are all in good shape. In fact, just seven of the 91 banks failed to make the grade. Five were in Spain, one in Greece, and one, Germany's Hypo Real Estate, is entirely owned by the German government anyway. Everyone else -- 84 institutions in all -- are supposed to be strong enough to withstand another economic shock.


It's not so much the stellar results that expose the optimism of a Primary degree rally, but rather the Banking Committee's stress tests themselves. They are notable primarily because they failed to test for any real stress in the first place. As the chart shows, the Committee's "adverse scenario" regarding economic performance assumed a mere 3% deviation from the European Commission's GDP forecast. 

Another test looked at banks' resilience to a sovereign risk shock, yet the analysis merely used conditions similar to those of May 2010. In other words, just like the UK budget office, the CEBS is utilizing a woefully diluted version of the economic deterioration that is about to grip the continent.
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FREE REPORT: Discover what Europe's debt crisis means for the future of the continent and your investments. Get your FREE 6-page report filled with unique analysis on Europe, the PIIGS and the sovereign debt crisis. EWI's European Financial Forecast editor Brian Whitmer gives you the context for what's happening in Europe and gets you up to speed on the reality of the situation. Download your free report now.

How to Find and "Hook" Potential Trade Setups

Here's anothr free lesson on how deploy the Elliott Wave Princple in your trading plan...

 Happy Trading!!


How to Find and "Hook" Potential Trade Setups   

A Free Lesson on How to Combine Technical Indicators with Elliott Wave Analysis
July 11, 2011

By Elliott Wave International

Trading using technical indicators -- such as the MACD, for example, Moving Average Convergence-Divergence -- can do one of two things: help you or hinder you. 

Using them as a forecasting method alone can be about as predictable as flipping a coin. But when you combine them with other forms of technical analysis (i.e. the Wave Principle), the same MACD can be your new best friend. 

Technical indicators are meant to do exactly what the name implies: "indicate" that a buy or sell signal may be in place. (Don't confuse "indicate" with "guarantee": They are not called "technical guarantors" for a reason.) 

Elliott Wave International's Futures Junctures editor Jeffrey Kennedy shows you how he uses technical indicators to his advantage in his FREE eBook, The Commodity Trader's Classroom:
"Rather than using technical indicators as a means to gauge momentum or pick tops and bottoms, I use them to identify potential trade setups."
Jeffrey goes on to describe his favorite indicator, the MACD:
"Out of the hundreds of technical indicators I have worked with over the years, my favorite study is the MACD [which] uses two exponential moving averages (12-period and 26-period). The difference between these two moving averages is the MACD line. The trigger or Signal line is a 9-period exponential moving average of the MACD line."
Figure 10-1 gives you an example of the MACD indicator in Coffee futures. 

Coffee - December Contract Daily Data

One of the signals of a potential trade setup that the MACD often introduces is what Jeffrey refers to as the Hook. Here's another quote from the free eBook:
"A Hook occurs when the MACD line penetrates, or attempts to penetrate, the Signal line and then reverses at the last moment. In addition to identifying potential trade setups, you can also use Hooks as confirmation. Rather than entering a position on a cross-over between the MACD line and Signal line, wait for a Hook to occur to provide confirmation that a trend change has indeed occurred. Doing so increases your confidence in the signal, because now you have two pieces of information in agreement."
Figure 10-4 gives you an example of the Hook at work in live cattle futures. 

Live Cattle - December Contract Daily Data

"A Hook should really just be a big red flag, saying that the larger trend may be ready to resume. It’s not a trading system that I follow blindly. All I'm looking for is a heads-up that the larger trend is possibly resuming." 

Learn more about other technical indicators that you can use to your advantage, as well as the other important lessons in the FREE 32-page eBook, The Commodity Trader's Cl
With QE3 back on the table I thought this would be a nice refresher...


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